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The Chicago Great Western Railway,  by David J. Fiore Sr.
 
The Chicago Great Western Railway (CGW) was a Midwestern line that operated in Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Minnesota, Kansas, and Nebraska.  Although this territory was served by much larger systems, the CGW was able to retain its share of passenger and freight business for 83 years through aggressive management, dedicated employees, innovations, and efficient operations.  By the early 1960s, however, the growth of the trucking industry and airlines had taken away a substantial amount of the business previously handled by railroads.  As operating costs increased while revenues declined, the only means of survival for the CGW was to consolidate with another railroad.  A favorable agreement was reached, and in July, 1968, the CGW ceased to exist as it became part of the Chicago and North Western Railway (C&NW).  Since then, however, much of the system has been abandoned, and today only a few segments of former CGW trackage remain in service.  This book provides nostalgic images and photographs of the operations, employees, locomotives, and stations of a little railroad that is now only a memory.
 
Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    
Price: $21.00
 

Chicago Cable Cars,  by Greg Borzo 

 

Upon hearing the term "cable car," most people think of San Francisco.  Yet for almost a quarter of a century Chicago boasted the largest cable car system the world has ever seen, transporting more than one billion riders.  This gigantic public work filled residents with pride--and filled robber barons' pockets with money.  It also sparked a cable car building boom that spread to 26 other U.S. cities.  But after 25 years, the boom went bust, and Chicago abandoned its cable car system.  Today, the fascinating story of the rise and fall of Chicago's cable cars is all but forgotten.  Greg Borzo guides readers through a stretch of Chicago's transit history that most people never knew existed--even though they have been walking past, riding over and even dining in remnants of it for years.

 

Softcover, 7.5 x 9, 192 pgs., 87 color images

Price:  $24.00


 

Chicago and the Illinois Central Railroad,  byClifford J. Downey 

 

Headquartered in Chicago, the Illinois Central Railroad was known as the “Main Line of Mid-America.”  It was a major railroad cutting through the middle section of the United States, with two major routes: the Main Line, running south out of Chicago toward New Orleans, and the Western Lines, which ran west toward Iowa.  The Illinois Central Railroad had eight major freight yards in Chicago, which in 1937 handled nearly two million freight cars.  Also well known for its passenger service, it operated some of the finest passenger trains: the Green Diamond, the all-Pullman Panama Limited, and the City of New Orleans.  With vintage photographs from the late 1880s to 1960, this book explores the passenger and freight trains, suburban trains, locomotives, shops and repair facilities, and the people who made the railroad function.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00

 

The Great Northern Railway Through Time,  by Dale Peterka

 

Board the Great Northern for a tour of the American Northwest―the last American frontier―from St. Paul, Minnesota, to Seattle, Washington.  The Great Northern opened up the Dakotas, Montana, Idaho, the dramatic Cascade Mountains of Washington and the Continental Divide at Marias Pass.  It was intended to be a freight-­hauling road, but tourists riding on the GN’s premier passenger train, The Empire Builder, were delighted by the prairie, farmlands, mountains, the Big Sky Country, and Glacier National Park.  The G.N.’s reputation grew.  Today, Amtrak’s Empire Builder traverses the same territory.  The Great Northern Railway Through Time presents photos taken over the course of 75 years by photographers of the era.  The author provides photo captions pointing out features that have changed over the years and those that have ​stayed the same.  The early photos are fresh―never before published.  The more recent shots were made by 20 of America’s finest rail enthusiast photographers.

 

Softcover, 6.5 x 9.25, 96 pgs., 200 color images

Price:  $21.95

 

Iowa's Last Narrow-Gauge Railroad,  by John Tigges and James Shaffer 

 

When talk began circulating in 1848 about the importance of railroads, the people of Cascade grew anxious.  Without direct access to navigable rivers other than the Mississippi, over 36 miles away, their community could very well fade from existence.  They needed a railroad as soon as possible.  The idea moved forward, but slowly.  With the backing of the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque and Minnesota Railroad Company, "the River Road," which ran along the western bank of the Mississippi River and passed through Bellevue, their dreams became reality in a three-foot-gauge line 31 years later, in 1879.  In 1880, the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway purchased the River Road, which included the narrow-gauge branch line to Cascade.  Overjoyed at having a larger entity involved, anticipation for the widening of the rails to standard gauge grew quickly.  This book relates the story from the beginning to its abandonment in 1936.  Today Bellevue and Cascade survive as thriving small towns and are economically healthy.  Despite the fact that 70 years have passed since the last spike was pulled, many people know of and recall Iowa's last narrow-gauge railroad.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price: $21.00

 

Kentucky and the Illinois Central Railroad,  by Clifford J. Downey


The Illinois Central Railroad (ICRR) operated approximately 600 miles of mainline track throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky, stretching from the Mississippi River to the central part of the state.  In addition to Louisville, the state's largest city, the ICRR also served dozens of small towns.  Kentucky's economy was built around coal mining and farming, and the ICRR played a major role in both industries.  ICRR's coal trains served as a conveyor for Kentucky coal moving to Midwest factories, and the road hauled a wide variety of agricultural products, including tobacco, grain, and fresh fruit.  No mention of the ICRR would be complete without discussing the fleet of fast passenger trains that whisked Kentucky residents to and from distant cities.  To maintain the locomotives that hauled all these trains the ICRR operated one of the nation's largest locomotive repair shops in Paducah.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00

 

 Kenosha on the Go,  prepared by Kenosha Streetcar Society

 

Kenosha on the Go chronicles 110 years of transportation in Kenosha.  From the first interurban streetcar that reached Kenosha’s northern city limits in 1897, to the existing transit system in 2007, this book covers local streetcar operations, trackless trolley and bus operations, the two electric interurbans that served Kenosha, and the North Western Railway. Kenosha on the Go also brings readers to the rebirth of streetcar operations in Kenosha at the dawn of the 21st century.  John F. Doyle, the primary author of this title, cofounded the Kenosha Streetcar Society with Louis Rugani of Kenosha in 2002.  Doyle was raised in Chicago where streetcars, interurbans, “L” trains, subway trains, trackless trolleys, and buses were all part of the everyday scene. When his family got its first car in 1945, a favorite memory was driving through Kenosha and viewing those trackless trolleys amid the classic downtown buildings.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price: $21.00

 

Louisville & Nashville Railroad in South Central Kentucky,  by Kevin Comer

 

At the midpoint of the 19th century, people and goods moved by river or muddy roads, which made traveling difficult; a stagecoach trip from Louisville to Nashville took 36 hours.  Railroads were coming into prominence, and the Louisville and Nashville Railroad was chartered in 1850. It was completed between the namesake cities in 1859, overcoming many obstacles such as Muldraugh’s Hill, Green River, and Tennessee Ridge.  The line became a pawn during the Civil War, used by both Union and Confederate forces, and endured heavy damages to survive and prosper.  The Louisville and Nashville Railroad would grow into one of America’s great success stories, expanding to nearly 7,000 miles of track throughout the Southeast.  This volume covers the L&N Main Line in southern Kentucky and northern Tennessee, the Memphis Line, the Mammoth Cave Railroad, the Glasgow Railway, the Portage Railroad, and a branch to Scottsville.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.

Price: $21.00

 

McKinney Avenue Trolleys,  by Jim Cumbie, Judy Smith Hearst & Phillip E. Cobb

 

Streetcar lines grew and prospered in Dallas from 1872 until the 1920s.  Automobile competition siphoned many of their riders away, but ridership soared again during World War II .  After the war, the trolleys entered an era of gradual attrition, and they were abandoned by 1956.  Amazingly, in 1989, the nonprofit McKinney Avenue Transit Authority (MATA ) returned restored vintage trolley cars to the city in the Uptown neighborhood near downtown.  MATA evolved from a tourist attraction into a true transit company and became the M-Line.  Since then, the area has experienced rapid growth and is now home to midrise office buildings and upscale apartments.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.

Price: $21.00

 

The Monon Railroad in Southern Indiana,  by David E. Longest

 

In the spring of 1847, James Brooks met with six associates in Providence to form the New Albany and Salem Rail Road Company and change the face of transportation in Indiana. Commonly called the Monon, the railroad served as a mover of people and the products they devoted their lives to producing.  This history of the line focuses on areas from New Albany to Bloomington.  It covers the two counties in Indiana that were a part of the Salem limestone district and how the stone was removed from the earth and eventually formed into some of the nation’s most beloved buildings and structures.  It also takes a look at the history of several lumber-based industries and the famed products that they manufactured.  New Albany was once known across America as a key producer of hardwood plywood, used in custom cabinetry, and the Showers Brothers Furniture Company of Bloomington was once the largest manufacturer of furniture in America.  Today the Monon is only a memory of a time when trains streaked across the hills and farmland of southern Indiana.  This book recalls the industries that created the cities and towns that many Hoosiers called home, and the railroad that helped make it possible.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.

Price: $21.00

 

Philadelphia Railroads,  by Allen Meyers & Joel Spivak

 

Philadelphia became the railroad capital of the world in the 1830s when 12 distinct lines opened within a 100-mile radius of the city to carry people and freight.  The railroad boom in the 19th century was made possible by the development of rural communities surrounding the city, the Industrial Revolution, excellent access to raw materials, and an influx of European immigrants. Philadelphia manufactured locomotives, railroad track, and other rail components and exported them around the world.  The ability to move agricultural goods, manufactured products, and people commuting from home to work helped to unite the 27 boroughs, districts, and townships into one metropolis by 1854.  Philadelphia Railroads features many unseen images and rare photographs documenting the leaders of Philadelphia's transportation world.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price:  $21.00

 

Portland's Streetcar Lines,  by Richard Thompson

 

Portland neighborhoods owe their location, alignment, and growth to a splendid, 19th-century innovation: the streetcar.  This city still bears the imprint of the carlines that once wove their way out to suburbs in every direction, including Fulton, Portland Heights, Goose Hollow, Nob Hill, Slabtown, Willamette Heights, Albina, Saint Johns, Irvington, Rose City, Mount Tabor, Montavilla, Mount Scott, and Sellwood.  As routes developed, people used them for more than just getting to work; they also discovered the recreational function of street railways while visiting friends, parks, and shopping areas farther from the center of town.  In 1927, the local street railway system entered a period of slow decline that ended in 1950, when Portland's last city streetcars gave way to buses.  The photographs and history in this volume will take readers back to an era when the clang of the trolley bell was a welcome part of neighborhood life.  


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price:  $21.00

 

The Pullman Porters and West Oakland,  by Thomas Tramble and Wilma Tramble 

 

A hub of transportation and industry since the mid-19th century, West Oakland is today a vital commercial conduit and an inimitably distinct and diverse community within the Greater Oakland metropolitan area.  The catalyst that transformed this neighborhood from a transcontinental rail terminal into a true settlement was the arrival of the railroad porters, employed by the Pullman Palace Car Company as early as 1867.  After years of struggling in labor battles and negotiations, the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters Union became the first African American union to sign a contract with a large American company.  The union’s West Coast headquarters were established at Fifth and Wood Streets in West Oakland.  Soon families, benevolent societies, and churches followed, and a true community came into being.  Photographs from museums, residents and descendants of original Pullman Porters illustrate this history of a community grown from their pioneering beginnings.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128pgs. 

Price: $19.99

 

Rockford Area Railroads,  by Mike Schafer & Brian Landis 

 

Railroads were key to Rockford's rise as a thriving manufacturing and commercial center.  With an area population of over 200,000 residents and a reputation for manufactured goods, Rockford had a critical need for railroads into the bust years of the 1970s.  Eventually four railroads rose to prominence in Rockford, all of them Class 1 carriers: the Chicago and North Western; Chicago, Burlington and Quincy; the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific (the Milwaukee Road); and Illinois Central.  For nearly a century, these four roads¾all of them esteemed Midwestern railroads¾carried the bulk of freight and passengers arriving and departing Rockford, Davis Junction, and Loves Park by rail.  Two other smaller railways, the Chicago, Milwaukee and Gary and the Rockford and Interurban, also played a part in Rockford's railroad history and are spotlighted in this volume.

    

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     
Price:  $21.00
 
San Francisco’s California Street Cable Cars, by Walter Rice, Emiliano Echeverria and Michael Dolgushkin 
 

San Francisco’s internationally recognized cable cars are the symbol of the individual character of a great city.  The California Street cable car line is one of only three remaining lines in the city. The California Street Railway, or Cal Cable, was developed and opened by Leland Stanford, one of the builders of the transcontinental railroad and later founder of Stanford University.  The iconic line, intimately connected with some of the West’s pioneer businessmen, was sold, expanded, and reached its peak mileage just after 1890, only to be destroyed in the great earthquake and fire of 1906.  As resilient as the city it served, Cal Cable was rebuilt and lasted as an independent business longer than any other private San Francisco transit company.  Reduced to its present form in 1954, that remnant and its double-ended cars survive as an integral part of today’s cable car system.  More than 200 vintage images take readers on a visually stunning ride through the California Street line’s past.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00

 

 

Seattle-Everett Interurban Railway, by Cheri Ryan & Kevin K. Stadler  

 

Operating for 29 years, the Seattle-Everett Interurban Trolley traveled over 29 miles of rail carrying passengers and freight to nearly 30 stops along its line.  In the first decade of the 1900s, the Boston electrical engineering firm of Stone and Webster had designs of building an interurban electric railway system that would eventually connect Olympia, Washington, and Vancouver, British Columbia.  To start the Seattle north link, they purchased the existing Seattle-Everett Interurban Railway Company from Fred E. Sander in 1908.  Early on the morning of April 30, 1910, the Seattle-Everett Interurban Trolley made its inaugural run, starting in Everett.  On February 20, 1939, the trolley left Everett for its last run.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00

 

Yakima Valley Transportation Company,  by Kenneth G. Johnsen

 

The National Register of Historic Places lists the Yakima Valley Transportation Company (YVT) as the last intact early 20th century electric interurban railroad in America.  From its beginning in 1907, the YVT was no quitter, surviving a takeover by the Union Pacific, large financial losses as the last trolley railroad in Washington state, attempts at dieselization, and a concerted effort to put the company in its grave.  Thanks to the efforts of local preservationists, YVT trolleys are still in operation.  The railroad and its infrastructure never changed. What is seen today is what was built 100 years ago¾ a living slice of history.  Yakima Valley Transportation Company is the most authoritative chronicle of the famous YVT yet compiled.  Author Dr. Kenneth G. Johnsen  persuaded Yakima's City Council to bring streetcars back to the YVT and has operated them as a volunteer motorman ever since.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price:  $21.00