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Transportation - On the Road
 
SAVE TIRES, GAS, TIME---AND MONEY---WITH

 AN ARMCHAIR TRIP BACK TO YESTERYEAR.

 
 

 Route 66 Remembered, by Michael Karl Witzel

 
In its heyday, the Mother Road was a rushing black river that carried millions across flat plains, scorching stretches of deserts and past hundreds of roadside haunts where drivers could fill up on gasoline and chicken-fried steak.  The author spent years traveling Route 66, collecting mementos of life and folklore that make it the most famous road in America.  This incredible collection of historical photographs captures the reverence of all the attractions and towns along the way.  Ride along with him as he takes readers back to the attractions and towns as they were and offers a captivating view of them today. 

Paperback, 10 x 10, 192 pgs., 125 color photos, 75 b&w 
Price: $19.95
 

Route 66,  by Tim Steil 

 
Decades after the introduction of “super highways,” Route 66 remains a nostalgic signifier of a 50-year period when cross-country travel involved observing marvelous new sights, meeting interesting characters and stopping to check the oil along the way.  In this colorful biopic of the "Mother Road," author Tim Steil retraces the wandering path from Chicago to Santa Monica to compile a photographic scrapbook of businesses and attractions that continue to operate alongside Route 66 despite the demise of the legendary two-lane.  It is an evocative look at motels, service stations, restaurants, truck stops, museums, and the colorful folks who continue to whittle out a livelihood along Route 66.

Softcover, 8.25 x 9, 96 pgs., 90 photos, mostly color

Price:  $17.95

 

Route 66 in Chicago,  by David G. Clark 

 

“It winds from Chicago to L.A.”—so says Nat “King” Cole’s classic hit “(Get Your Kicks on) Route 66.”  Beginning in 1926, Route 66 was the only U.S. highway providing a direct connection between the Windy City and the City of Angels.  Thus it is no wonder that Route 66 would become the metaphor of the American journey.  The crescent-shaped route from the shore of Lake Michigan to the southern Pacific Coast followed a corridor blazed by Native American footpaths, pioneer waterways, and transcontinental railroads.  As the frontier moved across the Great Plains to the ocean, Chicago was the point of embarkation for people emigrating from the east, and it was the marketplace for the products harvested in the west.  During the golden age of the car culture, Chicago was where people started their California trips as they took “the highway that’s the best.”

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.        

Price: $21.00

 

Route 66 in Springfield,  by Cheryl Jett

 

From 1926 through 1977, Route 66 carried millions of travelers from the shores of Lake Michigan to the Pacific Coast.  Americans fell in love with the automobile and made a family tradition of the road trip.  On its three different alignments through the capital city of Springfield, Route 66 took motorists around the Illinois State Fairgrounds, past the state capitol, and through Abraham Lincoln's neighborhood.  Mom-and-pop motels, gas stations, and eateries opened along the highway and became familiar landmarks to travelers in the "Land of Lincoln."  One of the first drive-up window restaurants opened in Springfield, and the "horseshoe" and the "cozy dog" became popular local foods.  A man operated his Route 66 gas station for 40 years before transforming it into an internationally known museum.  Meet the proprietors of these businesses, witness the growth of the highway, and enjoy a generous dose of nostalgia.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.  
Price:  $21.00

 

Route 66 in Madison County,  by Cheryl Jett

 

Route 66 zigzagged southwest across Madison County, Illinois, before crossing the Mississippi River into Missouri.  Various alignments of this segment of the "Mother Road" rolled through pastoral farmland, headed down main streets, and later straightened as it bypassed towns.  From 1926 to 1977, the path of the highway changed numerous times and crossed the Mississippi River on no less than five different bridges.  Along the way motorists watched for the blue neon cross on St. Paul's Lutheran Church to guide their nighttime travel; they counted on the doors of the Tourist Haven, Cathcart's, or the Luna Café to be open for business.  Travelers crossed their fingers that they wouldn't get stuck at the bend of the Chain of Rocks Bridge and hoped they could make it up Mooney Hill in the winter.  A later alignment took motorists right by Fairmount Park and Monks Mound.  The images in this book, gathered from libraries, organizations, and private collections take the reader on a tour of Madison County's unique segment of Route 66.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price:  $21.00

 

Route 66 in St. Louis,  by Joe Sonderman  

 

In 1926, highway planners laid out a ribbon of roadways connecting the nation.  One of the most important wove its way across eight states, from the cities of the heartland to golden California.  In The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck calls it “the Mother Road.”  Route 66 has become a legend, celebrated in books, movies, works of art, and popular music. The interstates could not kill it.  As “the Main Street of America,” Route 66 had to pass through “the Gateway to the West,” St. Louis.  Crossing the Mississippi River, the road took many different paths through the busy city and then united to travel into the rolling hills of the Ozarks.  Along the way there were mom-and-pop motels, tourist traps, roadside restaurants, a man selling frozen custard, one living with snakes, and another who claimed to be Jesse James.  Their stories are collected here by Joe Sonderman, a St. Louis radio veteran who wanted to discover the places the family station wagon sped past when he was a child. 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs. 

Price: $21.00

 

 

Route 66 in the Missouri Ozarks,  by Joe Sonderman

 

Route 66 in the Missouri Ozarks picks up the journey west where its companion book, Route 66 in St. Louis, leaves off.  As Bobby Troup’s song says, Route 66 travels “more than 2,000 miles all the way.”  But one would be hard-pressed to “Show Me” a more scenic and historic segment than the Missouri Ozarks.  The highway is lined with buildings covered with distinctive Ozark rock.  It winds through a region of deep forests, sparkling streams, hidden caves, and spectacular bluffs.  This book will take the traveler from Crawford County to the Kansas line. Along the way, there are small towns and urban centers, hotels and motels, cafés and souvenir stands.  Take the time to explore Missouri’s Route 66—it’s waiting at the next exit. 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs. 

Price: $21.00

 

 

Route 66 in Oklahoma,  by Joe Sonderman & Jim Ross

 

Oklahoma is where East and West collide on Route 66, where the rolling hills that reach across its borders from Missouri and Arkansas give way to red earth and Big Sky Country.  It is a land of agriculture, oil, and Native America.  Route 66 stamped itself into the landscape here in 1926, extending from the state’s northeast corner through Tulsa and Oklahoma City to the Texas Panhandle in the west.  Today, its pathway in Oklahoma is rich with small-town ambiance and landmarks, including many of the route’s most popular attractions.  From the magnificent Coleman Theatre in Miami to the Oklahoma Route 66 Museum in Clinton, the Mother Road across the Sooner State is an explorer’s feast.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price: $21.00

 

Route 66 in Arizona,  by Joe Sonderman


In Arizona, Route 66 is a ribbon tying together spectacular natural attractions such as the Grand Canyon, the Petrified Forest, the Painted Desert, and the Meteor Crater.  There were plenty of man-made diversions along the way, too.  Roadside businesses used Native American and Western imagery to lure travelers to fill up their gas tank, grab a meal, or spend the night. Roadside signs featured shapely cowgirls and big black jackrabbits, or warned of killer snakes and prehistoric monsters.  Between wails of "Are we there yet?" children pleaded to stay at motels shaped like wigwams, explore the Apache Death Cave, or pick up a rubber tomahawk at a trading post. Arizona may be the most spectacular state on Route 66.  Collected here, hundreds of nostalgic images of Arizona's Route 66 and detailed histories of the attractions found along the way recall a time when getting there was half the fun.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     
Price: $21.00

 

Route 66 in New Mexico,  by Joe Sonderman 

 

New Mexico is "The Land of Enchantment," offering a fascinating blend of Native American, Spanish Colonial, and Western American cultures.  In an era before “superhighways,“ travelers from the East knew they had arrived in the great Southwest when they entered New Mexico.  The towns along Route 66 were ablaze in neon, and the motels lured travelers with Western themes, Pueblo Revival architecture, and Native American trading posts.  An adventure still awaits today’s traveler who takes the time to exit I-40 and leave the franchised blandness behind. The neon still flickers at the Blue Swallow Motel in Tucumcari, on Central Avenue in Albuquerque, and at the El Rancho Hotel in Gallup.  The "Fat Man" still smiles at Joseph's Bar and Grill in Santa Rosa.  The stories behind those landmarks are here, as well as the stories behind establishments that are lost forever or slowly crumbling to dust among the tumbleweeds.  

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs. 

Price: $21.00

 

Route 66 in California,  by Glen Duncan 


The “Mother Road” hauled it all, traversing the American West from Chicago to Santa Monica Beach, the last 350 miles through Southern California.  For settlers, Depression-era “Okies” and “Arkies,” and post–World War II families bound for suburbia, Route 66 was a migration funnel for generations. Wending through the mountains and badlands of San Bernardino County into Los Angeles County, Route 66 became a state of mind and a catchphrase for travelers everywhere, especially after singer Nat King Cole popularized Bobby Troupe’s song “(Get Your Kicks on) Route 66.”  Later, actors Martin Milner and George Maharis hit the road with the ragtop down and the shades on in the television series that bore its name.  The shield of the Route 66 sign has become iconography for the growth of Southern California’s economy, population, popularity, and folklore. Many museum, library, and governmental collections, and current images of what still exists.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.      

Price: $21.00

 

St. Ignace Car Culture,  by Edward K. Reavie 

 

St. Ignace hosted its first car show in 1976 as part of the bicentennial celebration.  Over the years, the annual gathering has grown into one of the largest collector-vehicle events in the country.  This lakeside community overlooking the mighty Mackinac Bridge and historic Mackinac Island boasts a spectacular waterfront--the perfect backdrop for a stunning array of eye-catching vehicles.  In the early years, media referred to this show as "dessert."  As the numbers of participants and attendees grew, it became known as the "main course."  For teenagers growing up in the 1950s it was all new--cruisin', drive-ins, drag strips, the country's intense love affair with the automobile, and the birth of rock 'n roll.  Over 34 years, the St. Ignace Car Show has brought hundreds of automotive legends to town, and car-show traffic set crossing records on the Mackinac Bridge that are unlikely ever to be broken.  So fire up the hot rod and cruise back to a simpler time . . . all these cars and still no traffic light! 

 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.  

Price: $21.00

 

 

Indiana's Historic National Road: The East Side from Richmond to Indianapolis

Compiled by Alan E. Hunter & Joseph M Jarzen for the Indiana National Road Association

 

The Indiana National Road Association hopes the photographs and stories within this book will give readers an appreciation for the 200-year past of the Historic National Road, often called “The Road that Built the Nation.”  This federally designated All-American Road retains much of the integrity from its early days as a pioneer corridor.  It is important for people to learn about these stories and about those who lived and worked along the road so that they can understand more about both themselves and the importance of preserving the highway.  This volume looks at the section of the road from Richmond to Indianapolis.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00

 

Indiana's Historic National Road: The West Side, Indianapolis to Terre Haute

Compiled by Alan E. Hunter for The Indiana National Road Association 

 

This byway is designated an All-American Road through the National Scenic Byways program and traverses six states from Baltimore, Maryland, to East St. Louis, Illinois.  The road began as a primary route west for pioneers, and today the byway allows travelers to explore the American past—it is truly “the road that built the nation.”  This volume, continuing the story that began on the eastern leg of the road, invites readers to complete their photographic journey westward from Indianapolis to Terre Haute.  These images document the people and stories that are part of the National Road’s heritage.  It is hoped this book will encourage advocacy for the protection of important heritage resources.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.
Price: $21.00 

 

The Lincoln Highway across Indiana,  by Jan Shupert-Arick 

 

Once known as the “Main Street of America,” the Lincoln Highway route was established across northern Indiana in 1913, linking larger cities—Fort Wayne, Elkhart, Goshen, South Bend, LaPorte, and Valparaiso—to smaller communities.  Most Lincoln Highway towns renamed their main streets Lincolnway in recognition of the nation’s first coast-to-coast auto road.  When the route was shortened the in 1926, it linked Fort Wayne to Columbia City, Warsaw, and Plymouth, giving the state two Lincoln Highway routes.  From Fort Wayne to the famous Ideal Section, between Dyer and Schererville, Indiana’s Lincolnway towns remain proudly connected to Lincoln Highway history.  Through vintage photographs, postcards, advertisements, and other historical records, this armchair tour of the highway visits sites favored by early tourists, documents the people and places that made the highway a vital corridor, and celebrates Indiana’s place in early automotive and road-building history.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00

 

The Dixie Highway in Illinois,  by James R. Wright    

 

The Dixie Highway, once a main thoroughfare from Chicago to Miami, was part of an improved network of roads traversing the landscape of 10 states.  A product of the Good Roads Movement of the early 20th century, construction on the highway in Illinois took place from 1916 to 1921.  When completed in 1921, the Dixie Highway was the longest continuous paved road in the state.  It ran through parts of Cook, Will, Kankakee, Iroquois, and Vermilion Counties, with service stations, roadside diners, and campgrounds sprouting up along the way.  With over 200 vintage photographs, The Dixie Highway in Illinois takes readers on a tour from the Art Institute of Chicago, in the heart of the city on Michigan Avenue, to the Illinois state line east of Danville, exploring this historic highway and the communities it passes through.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price: $21.00

 

The Dixie Highway in Indiana,  by Russell S. Rein and Jan Shupert-Arick

 

In 1914, the time was right to promote the second transcontinental auto highway.  Following the success of the Lincoln Highway, the Dixie Highway pushed the development of commerce and tourism for the southern states.  The Dixie Highway system grew to include routes from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, and Chicago to Miami Beach.  In Indiana, the Dixie Highway became parts of Indiana 933, US 31, Indiana 25, Indiana 29, US 421, Indiana 37, and US 150. The dogleg from Chicago to Indiana became part of US 136.  The authors of this book both are past national officers of the Lincoln Highway Association

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price: $21.00

 

Northern Kentucky's Dixie Highway,  by Deborah Kohl Kremer

 

Northern Kentucky’s Dixie Highway is a slice of Americana pie.  Known also as U.S. 25 and the Lexington-Covington Turnpike, the once-rural route connects the urban cores of Cincinnati, Covington, and Newport to Central Kentucky.  Originally a buffalo trail and named in the early 1800s, the route became a paved national highway in the 1920s.  The creation of the thoroughfare encouraged the growth of several communities along its route that still thrive today.  This book captures historic images of the people and places along the Dixie Highway, beginning in Covington and heading south through Boone County.  The 200 photographs—some dating back to the mid-1800s—depict time’s influence while offering readers a chance to revisit the friends, familiar sites, and memorable times enjoyed along Northern Kentucky’s Dixie Highway. 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.      

Price: $21.00

 

Tennessee's Dixie Highway: Springfield to Chattanooga,  by Leslie N. Sharp

 

The late 19th and early 20th Century vision of the New South relied upon economic growth and access.  The development of the Dixie Highway from 1914 to 1927--with its eastern and western branches running from Ontario, Canada, south to Miami, Florida--would help facilitate this dream, attracting industry, tourists, and even new residents.  This book tells the story of people, places, politics, and organizations behind the construction of the road from Springfield, Tennessee, to Chattanooga.  This section is particularly important, as it was roughly the halfway point of the route and contained the headquarters of the Dixie Highway Association in Chattanooga.  It also included the seemingly insurmountable Monteagle Mountain in Marion County--the very last portion of the national north-south highway to be completed.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.
Price:  $21.00

 

North Georgia's Dixie Highway, by Amy Gillis Lowry, Abbie Tucker Parks 
  

Travelers on North Georgia’s Dixie Highway in the first half of the 20th century experienced a unique excursion.  The first interstate highway to link the American South to the urban North was conceived as a tourism route.  Local communities vied for a place on the route, a chance to show off local attractions, and for a piece of the economic action.  The highway drew visitors to natural wonders, Native American historic sites, and Civil War battlefields.  Local entrepreneurs built tourist courts, cabins, inns, and motels and opened hot dog stands, diners, and restaurants and service stations to accommodate the nascent automobile.  Resourceful men and women sold farm produce and local handiworks at roadside markets.  Handmade chenille coverlets were especially popular.  This book traces the development of the tourism route, the growth of businesses serving the visitors, and the evolution of the tufted bedspread into the modern tufted carpet industry. 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.               

Price: $21.00