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Transportation - Air & Water

 

 

The 1910 Los Angeles International Air Meet,  by Kenneth E. Pauley

 

America's first international air meet was held January 10-20, 1910, in Los Angeles on a mesa called Dominguez Hill, situated 13.5 miles south of Los Angeles.  Enthusiasm for aviation was stirred by the first international air meet in 1909 in Rheims, France, where American aviator Glenn H. Curtiss won three prestigious speed prizes and 36,000 francs.  An even more spectacular air meet, which would also invigorate the local economy, was promoted for Los Angeles.  Businessman Dick Ferris, the Los Angeles Merchants and Manufacturers Association, and the Los Angeles Examiner collaborated to make it possible.  Most Americans had never seen the newfangled machines that soared in the skies.  Initially skeptical, they soon were awed.  So began America's love affair with aviation.  The air meet influenced aviation in Southern California and transportation worldwide into the 21st century.  

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price: $21.00

 

 

The Aviators: Eddie Rickenbacker, Jimmy Doolittle, Charles Lindberg, and the Epic Age of Flight 

 

Written by the gifted storyteller Winston Groom (author of Forrest Gump), The Aviators tells the saga of three extraordinary aviators--Charles Lindbergh, Eddie Rickenbacker, and Jimmy Doolittle--and how they redefined heroism through their genius, daring, and uncommon courage.

 

Hardcover

Price:  $29.85                             

 

 

 

Chicago Maritime History,  compiled by Chicago Maritime Society

 

Maritime history speaks of heroes and vagabonds, lighthouses and shipwrecks, industrialists and back-breaking labor, wartime vigilance and peacetime leisure.  But not necessarily of the sea!  Established astride a primary portage linking the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River, Chicago has an overlooked maritime story that comprises all this and more. 

Paddling through the area on his way home to Montreal in 1673, French-Canadian voyageur Louis Jolliet was the first to notice the potential utility of the place that was to become Chicago.  The American Indian nations the Illiniwek and Wea, knew the place as a canoe portage between the Mississippi and St. Lawrence rivers.  But none ever dreamed that the sluggish Chicago River would become one of the busiest ports in the world and the city that arose on its banks a transportation center of the North American interior.  The Chicago Maritime Society takes you into this lively world and guides you through the passages of Chicago’s waterway history with a collection of their best writings, photos, and artifacts. 

      

                                                                                                   

Softcover, 6 x 9, 378 pgs.

Price:  $19.95

 
Erie Canal,  by Martin Morganstein and Joan H. Cregg
 
The building of the Erie Canal was an engineering marvel that unleashed the growth of a young nation that was the United States.  Spearheaded by the vision of Gov. Dewitt Clinton, New York State built the waterway that opened the West to settlement and made New York City the center of finance and commerce.  Opened in 1825, the canal proved so commercially viable that construction of an enlarged Erie Canal began just eleven years later.  The success of the canal spawned the growth of cities, towns, businesses, and industries along its route in upstate New York.  Photos from the Erie Canal Museum collection take you back to the heyday of the old canal to view images of mule-drawn boats wending their way through scenic countryside and marvel at the engineering of the bridges, aqueducts, and locks that facilitated the functioning of the canal.  Join the authors as they take a step back in time for a ride that illuminates the people whose lives were shaped by the canal.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.
Price: $21.00
 

Here Comes the Boat!  by  R. G. Bluemer 

 
Thanks to Mark Twain, most folks are familiar with the glory days of riverboats on the Mississippi.  Few may know of an equally thriving traffic of boats on the Illinois River and the Illinois-Michigan Canal.  Early explorers and traders dreamed of a canal to connect the river with Lake Michigan.  Soon after Illinois became a state in 1818, a plan was devised, but building the canal took 30 hard years.  Historian R. G. Bluemer recalls the steamboats, towboats and showboats that traveled the canal and the river with detailed stories and a marvelous collection of photos.

 

Softcover, 8 x 11, 112 pgs.     
Price:  $24.80
 
The Inland Water Route,  by Matthew J. Friday

 

From its humble beginnings as a trading route for Native Americans, Northern Michigan's Inland Route has become one of the most scenic and memorable voyages anywhere in America.  As a series of interconnected lakes and rivers from Cheboygan to Conway, the Inland Route touches several Northern Michigan communities and links them through her winding rivers and vast lakes.  After improvements to the waterway in the 1870s, bigger boats and log booms started drifting down the route; but though once a necessity for fur traders and lumbermen, the meandering waterway soon blossomed with dozens of tourist boats, hotels, resorts, and cottages.  The result was a memorable voyage filled with natural beauty, recreation, and socialization.  The images in this book recall the story of the Inland Route from its early history through the era of the inland steamers, taking the reader on a voyage of discovery and relaxation through unrivaled beauty and history.

 
Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 Pgs.      
Price: $21.00 
 

Lake Michigan's Aircraft Carriers,  by Paul M. Somers

 

This is the story of two Great Lakes excursion ships converted for use as aircraft carrier training during World War II.  Through the duration of the war, the United States Navy qualified 17,800 pilots for aircraft carrier operation.  Training the pilots on either the Atlantic or the Pacific Ocean would have exposed the ships to the danger of submarine attack.  It would also have required arming and armoring the ships and providing an escort of fighting ships that were needed elsewhere.  Commander R. F. Whitehead came up with an idea of doing the training on the protected waters of the Great Lakes.  The USS Wolverine and the USS Sable were chosen and thus became the only fresh water, paddle-wheeled, coal-fired aircraft carriers in the history of the world.  The author draws upon his collection of vintage photos and a lifetime of research to detail the history of these two great vessels, from their life as cruise ships to their use in the war effort and then to their eventual scrapping. 

 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.   

Price:  $21.00

 
 

Midway Airport,  by David E. Kent 

 

In 1903, Chicago fell in love with flying.  Enterprising people opened airfields and designed and built aircraft, and aviators won big money at air meets.  After World War I, aviation offered explosive commercial potential.  A transcontinental airmail service was established and became the impetus for the first airlines.  Aspiring to be first in aviation, the City of Chicago chose a square mile of property 10 miles southwest of the city as the location for what would soon become the "World's Busiest Airport."  Midway Airport captures the ethos and thrill of the Midway experience during a time when people dressed up for air travel or just visited the airport, dined at the Cloud Room, and gazed from Midway's observation platforms at the incredible aerial ballet before them.  It was a magical time, when flying off into the clouds in beautiful silver airliners meant traveling in style.  Today, Midway Airport remains a roaring, rumbling, bustling center of air transportation and the busiest square mile in the world.

 

                                                                                                     

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.

Price:  $21.00

 

The Mississippi River: Father of Waters,  by John T. Tigges and James L. Shaffer  

 

Named by Algonkian-speaking Indians, Mississippi can be translated as "Father of Waters."  North America’s largest river drains 31 states and 2 Canadian provinces, and runs 2,350 miles from its source to the Gulf of Mexico.  The Mississippi has always been important to those who lived along its banks.  Indigenous peoples fished its waters and depended on it for travel and transportation.  Explorers and traders traveled up and down the river, while settlers moved close to take advantage of the rich farmland it provided.  The prosperous trade this spawned brought about social and economic change as news and goods made their way downriver and livelihoods were provided.  In fact, the Mississippi River's economic and strategic value was so important that when Ulysses S. Grant won the siege of Vicksburg and control of the river during the Civil War, the Confederacy was dealt a serious blow.  Today, goods being transported up and down the Mississippi share its waters with pleasure boats and floating casinos that elicit memories of the river’s showboats of yore. 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.      

Price: $21.00 

 

 

Ohio River Images: Cincinnati to Louisville in the Packet Boat Era,  by Russell G. Ryle

  

From 1900 to 1930, the Ohio River provided the most economical and reliable means of transporting goods and people from Cincinnati, Ohio, to Louisville, Kentucky, and to the dozens of towns that lay between.  This fascinating pictorial history gives a glimpse into that area’s past and its extensive river heritage.  A Sunday cruise down the Ohio River could be pleasant, but traveling the waters was not always easy.  Spring floods reached far inland, disrupting homes and businesses and putting pilots’ navigational skills to the test in swiftly-moving water filled with floating debris.  Ice wreaked havoc on boats and shore facilities in the winter.  Low water in the summer often brought navigation to a halt. Yet the importance of the boats was such that they endured and served the area faithfully until hard times and a new reliance on trucks and automobiles ended the packet trade in the early 1930s.  The author shares stories of those who lived when steam whistles announced the boats’ arrival at towns along the river route.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.
Price: $21.00


 

 

Pacific Southwest Airlines,  by Alan Renga & Mark E. Mentges  

 

With its low fares and friendly service, Pacific Southwest Airlines (PSA) was one of the most successful regional airlines in American history.  Its distinctive orange, red, and white planes were immediately recognizable to those living on the West Coast.  The airline was also known for employing beautiful and sociable flight attendants.  Kenny Friedkin, the founder of PSA, started in 1949 with one leased DC-3 and expanded his fleet to serve millions of passengers each year.  Although PSA is no longer in operation, its successful business model of low-priced, efficient service was copied by other airlines and today is considered the norm.  In addition, former PSA employees still gather annually to relive the camaraderie they experienced as being a part of a truly unique airlines. 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price:  $21.00

 

US Airways,  by William Lehman

 

US Airways began its adventurous history in 1939 as All American Aviation, flying single-engine Stinson Reliant aircraft as a contract carrier for the US Postal Service.  By 1953, All American became Allegheny Airlines, with the goal to become one of America's premier airlines in the East.  Allegheny grew by acquiring other airlines: first Lake Central Airlines in 1968, then Mohawk Airlines in 1972.  In 1979, Allegheny became US Air, reflecting its intent to grow to the West Coast.  Then came mergers with PSA in 1988, Piedmont in 1989, Trump Shuttle in 1992, and America West in 2005.  Now the fifth-largest airline in the United States, operating more than 2,000 flights daily, US Airways will become part of the largest line when it completes a pending merger with American Airlines.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.

Price:  $21.00                     

 

 

Steamboats on the Hudson River,  by William H. Ewen Jr

 

The Hudson River was the cradle of American steamboating.  While many people think of steamboats on inland rivers like the Mississippi, the type of steamboat that evolved on the Hudson was far more typical of those that operated throughout North America.  From Robert Fulton's steamboat through the last steamer on the river almost 170 years later, these boats were an integral part of the life and commerce of the Hudson River valley.  Whether it was a huge 400-foot side-wheeler, a small freight boat, excursion boats, or a ferry crossing, almost every river community was served by a steamboat.  The author, a noted maritime historian, presents a wonderful selection of images from his personal collection, the Hudson River Maritime Museum and other private sources.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price:  $21.00