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The Old West
 
 
Cherokee Strip Land Rush,  by Jay M. Price
 
On September 16, 1893, over 100,000 people converged on the edges of six million acres just south of the Kansas border, a parcel officially designated the Cherokee Outlet but more commonly called the Cherokee Strip.  This was the largest of the land rushes, in which officials threw open whole parcels of land at one time.  The opening of the outlet drew people with a wide mix of motivations. They arrived that stifling September to find heat, dust, wretched conditions, high prices—and hope. Among them was William Prettyman, whose photographs remain the most stirring record of the event.  When the starting gun went off at noon, the blurred images of people and animals racing across the dusty terrain became part of the memory of an entire region.
 
Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     
Price: $21.00
 

Cheyenne Frontier Days,  by Starley Talbott & Linda Graves Fabian

Cheyenne Frontier Days originated in 1897, conceived as a signature event to revive the thrilling incidents and pictures of life in the Old West.  The organizers envisioned a celebration that would bring visitors from all over the world to the capital city of Wyoming.  Cheyenne residents have long valued the rural lifestyle that inspired the creation of this frontier festival.  For over a century, Cheyenne Frontier Days has been the spirit, heart, and soul of the community and the cowboy way of life. Today, it has evolved into the world's largest outdoor rodeo and celebration of its kind.  The authors have compiled 200 photos from locals, the Cheyenne Frontier Days Old West Museum, the Wyoming State Archives and the American Heritage Center.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.

Price:  $21.00                                               

 

 
El Paso and The Mexican Revolution, by Patricia Haesly Worthington
 
The Mexican Revolution took place along the entire length of the border between the United States and Mexico.  Most of the intense battles and revolutionary intrigue, however, were concentrated in the border region of El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.  For 20 years, the U.S. and Mexico border communities dealt with revolution, beginning before the 1909 Taft-Diaz visit and ending with the Escobar Revolution of 1929.  In between were battles, assassinations, invasions, and attempts at diplomacy.  El Paso was center stage for many of these events.  Newspapers and media from all over the country flocked to the border and produced numerous stories, photographs, and colorful renditions of the Mexican Revolution.  The facts and myths have been kept alive over the last 100 years, and the revolution remains an important topic of discussion today. 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs. 
Price: $21.00
 
The Little Bighorn: Tiospaye,  by Kenneth D. Shields Jr
 
In June of 1876, members of various northern Plains tribes gathered at the Little Bighorn River to form the largest Indian encampment in recorded American history.  The huge gathering, called Tiospaye, encompassed over 1,000 lodges housing approximately 7,000 men, women, and children.  The subsequent defeat of General Custer and the Seventh Cavalry would forever alter the course of Native American history.  In over 200 vintage photographs, this new book showcases images of the lifestyle of the encampment and the many brave leaders who fought at the infamous Battle of Little Bighorn, including Sitting Bull and the author's grandfather, Feather Earring.

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    
Price: $21.00

 
 

 Oklahoma City: Land Run to Statehood,  by Terry L. Griffith

 

Located along the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, at a stop known as Oklahoma Station, Oklahoma City was born on April 22, 1889, at 12 noon.  By 6:00 p.m., it had a population of around 10,000 citizens.  As with any birth, there were many firsts in the newly opened territory, and many of these landmark events have been captured and preserved in historic photographs.  The stories of prosperity and development of the area’s first settlers are told here with images culled from the archives of the Oklahoma Historical Society and other collections.  Vsiting for the first time, Theodore Roosevelt announced, “Men and women of Oklahoma, I was never in your country until last night, but I feel at home here.  I am blood of your blood, and bone of your bone, and bound to you by the strongest ties that can bind one man to another.”


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    
Price: $21.00
 
The Texas Rangers,  by Chuck Parsons & Joe B. Davis
 
Texas Rangers.  The words evoke exciting images of daring, courage, high adventure.  The Rangers began as a handful of men protecting their homes from savage raiding parties.  Now, in their third century of existence, they are a highly sophisticated crime-fighting organization.  Yet at times even today a Ranger mounts his horse to track fugitives through dense chaparral, depending on his wits more than technology.  The iconic image of the Texas Ranger is of a man who is tall, unflinching, and dedicated to doing a difficult job no matter what the odds.  The Rangers of the 21st century are different sizes, colors, and genders, but remain as hardy and dedicated today as in the horseback days of 1823, when their territory was a wild and untamed land.

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    
Price: $21.00
 
 

The Twenty Mule Team of Death Valley,  by Ted Fayego

 

The image of 20 mules hauling a train of wagons was once as familiar as the golden arches.  It was the trademark of Pacific Coast Borax’s most famous product, a laundry additive called Twenty Mule Team Borax.  The company’s advertising was linked to the connection between the twenty mule teams and America’s most notorious desert, Death Valley.  From 1883 to 1888, teams of mules and wagons hauled borax out of the famed valley on the California-Nevada border.  The teams were not famous then; they were just a common means of transportation.  It was not the first time 20 mules hauled borax and it was not the longest or the most treacherous path.  This is the story of how this common form of transportation (the big-rig truck of its day) become transformed into an American icon.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.

Price:  $21.00                                                         

 

Wyoming's Outlaw Trail,  by Mac Blewer

 

A historic and folkloric path that meandered from Canada to Mexico, the Outlaw Trail was used by outlaws such as Butch Cassidy, the Sundance Kid, and the James brothers. Following existing Western routes such as the Oregon Trail, the highway connected towns and natural hideouts used by bandits escaping the law.  Some in Western communities were sympathetic toward the outlaws.  Many, like Cassidy, were seen as Robin Hoods, fighting for common people who were under siege by economic forces, corporate encroachment, and other changes occurring in the Old West.  Historian Mac Blewer's wide-ranging selection of images details the history, folklore, and geography behind some of Wyoming's outlaw towns and hideouts--chief among them the Hole in the Wall and Red Desert.  Also highlighted are the deeds of the robbers, lawmen, and ordinary folk who rode those dusty trails during the late 1800s and early 1900s.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.

Price:  $21.00                                                                                                         

 

Wells Fargo,  by Dr. Robert J. Chandler

 

Those striking images of stagecoaches traversing rugged mountain terrain are part and parcel of Wells Fargo's storied past.  When Henry Wells and William Fargo founded the company in 1852, the gold rush had already brought thousands of people to California and uncovered the largest amount of wealth then known to the world.  Wells Fargo served a unique role as a banking, transport and mail-delivery agency.  In 1857, the company helped establish the Overland Mail Company; in 1861, it operated the Pony Express; and in 1866, it put together a 3,000-mile network of stagecoaches running between California and Nebraska.  Three decades later, Wells Fargo covered the nation over a web of iron rails.  Miners and merchants, ranchers and farmers all depended on Wells Fargo.  The company always used the fastest means possible for its deliveries and fund transfers, whether by riverboat, ocean steamer, pony express, stagecoach, railroad--or the fastest method of all, the telegraph.  From its rough-and-ready deliveries to its growth as a modern banking power, the tumultuous story of Wells Fargo mirrors the American West.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price: $21.00