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States - Indiana

 

Beech Grove, Indiana,  by Jim Hillman & John Murphy, Beech Grove Public Library  

 

Early-20th-century Indianapolis was developing into a major transportation center.  The extension of rail lines operated by the "Big Four Railroad," the Cleveland, Chicago, Cincinnati, and St. Louis Railway, invaded farmland 5 miles southeast of the busy Indianapolis Union Station.  By 1904, the native beech trees neighbored the Big Four Shops, housing production of steam locomotives.  The shops brought jobs and drew commercial and residential development, culminating in 1906 when the unnamed, adjacent community incorporated as the town of Beech Grove.  A century later, the city of Indianapolis has grown to entirely surround the vibrant community, yet Beech Grove retains its small town atmosphere.  Anchored by a vibrant Main Street, the charm of Beech Grove is found within quiet residential neighborhoods, distinguished schools, diverse churches, and major employers, including Amtrak and St. Francis Hospital.  The authors explore Beech Grove history through more than 200 rare, seldom-seen images.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.  

Price:  $21.00

 

Danville, Indiana,  by Jeffrey K. Baldwin 

 

Danville, created in 1824 as the county seat of Hendricks County, was the hub of government, commerce, and agriculture.  Farmers sold their crops in town and shopped there.  As the agricultural economy diminished, Danville became home to workers commuting to Indianapolis.  Danville residents have always valued education.  On May 10, 1878, at the instigation of Prof. W. F. Harper of the Central Normal School of Ladoga, 50 farm wagons from Danville arrived at Ladoga and stole the whole school, including equipment, students, faculty, and baggage.  Central Normal College was then installed in the facility previously housing the Hendricks County Seminary and the Danville Academy.  From 1878 to 1951, Central Normal College was a Danville institution, turning out more than 75,000 graduates destined for leadership roles in education, business, law, and politics.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.  

Price:  $21.00

 

Dyer, Indiana,  by Paul Anthony Benninghoff, Dyer Historical Society

 

What was once an ancient shoreline of Lake Michigan, mired with swamp and sand dunes, is today the town of Dyer.  Its history consists of the old Sauk Trail-turned-highway, strong-willed and hardworking visionaries such as Aaron Hart who drained the swamps and created farmlands, entrepreneurs who developed the early businesses and established Dyer as a town in 1910, and events such as the arrival of the locomotive and automobile that altered the lives of its citizens and shaped Dyer into the populated and bustling town it is today.  From a sleepy farming community to a distant suburb of Chicago, the town of Dyer has a history both rich in its own right and very much tied to American history.  Through the photographic collection of the Dyer Historical Society, Dyer's history unfolds in a beautiful latticework of visual and text combined.  One will see how a small American town unique to its geological location is impressed onto the land and how influences by events unfolding beyond its borders can help create, and sometimes jeopardize, its identity.

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs. 

Price:  $21.00 

 

Indiana's Covered Bridges,  by Robert Reed

 
Once there were hundreds of 19th-century and very early 20th-century covered bridges in Indiana--so many in fact, that the state ranked third in the nation in the number of structures still standing.  By the early 1930s and 1940s, a movement was afoot to preserve those magnificent structures that had not already disappeared due to desertion and deterioration.  Some were saved, but many were not.  What was saved and cherished, however, was an abundance of vintage black and white images taken by pioneer photographers who willingly trekked from bridge to bridge decades ago.  Captured in this volume are nearly 200 of those photographs from the mid-20th century and before, representing more than 36 Indiana counties from Adams County to Wells County.  Hoosier author Robert Reed caringly chronicles the tale of this charming chapter in Indiana history.
 
Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     
Price: $19.95 

 

Indiana's Lincolnland,  by Mike Capps & Jane Ammeson  

 

Illinois may be known as the “Land of Lincoln,” but Abraham Lincoln spent the formative years from the age of 7 until he turned 21 in southwestern Indiana, living with his family on a farmstead in the rolling hills of this beautiful rural area.  The Lincoln family moved from Kentucky, crossing the Ohio River and settling in an area known as Little Pigeon Creek in December 1816.  Now known as Lincoln City, the town is just one of several stops on a back roads tour that takes wanderers through many historic sites, representing important moments in the life of a great man.  Lincoln’s mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln, is buried here, and the cabin where his cousin lived and Lincoln spent the night still stands.  Folks wanting to retrace Lincoln’s life in southern Indiana can do so easily by following the narrow roads that traverse the 20-mile area where he lived and traveled during those 14 years when he called Indiana home.  The people of the region still claim Lincoln as one of their own.


Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    
Price $19.95
 
 
Michigan City,  by Rose Anna Mueller
 
Nestled on the southern most shores of the Great Lakes, Michigan City was established in 1836.  An abundance of pine and hardwoods gave rise to a thriving lumber industry, and by the end of the century, Michigan City was one of the largest lumber markets in the state.  The city's harbor and the arrival of the railroad brought new industry, from the manufacture of rail cars to glassmaking and flour mills.  Michigan City even pitted itself against Chicago in a race to become the major port on Lake Michigan.  The early twentieth century saw a rise in tourism as lakefront attractions sprang up.  Excursionists arrived by boat and train for bathing, shooting galleries, a merry-go-round and roller coaster, and the Oasis Ballroom.  As a result of the city's dune preservation efforts in the 1960s and 1970s, the city continues as a haven for water sports and a resort for Chicagoans and others in the Midwest.

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.  

Price: $21.00