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Lighthouses
 
California Lighthouse Life in the 1920s and 1930s,  by Wayne Wheeler 
 
Like giant sentinels standing guard, California's lighthouses keep silent vigils over the turbulent waters of the Pacific.  In 1850, Congress appropriated funds to build eight lighthouses on the West Coast.  The first lighthouse to become operational on the West Coast was that on Alcatraz Island on June 1, 1854.  While the other seven were being completed, Congress authorized additional funds, and by 1930 California boasted 40 light stations.  This photographic history contains over 200 rare and beautiful images featuring lighthouses of the South Coast, San Francisco Bay, and the North Coast, as well as lightships and support facilities. Taken mostly before 1940, they depict an era when lighthouses provided a secure means of employment for the tenders who kept their lights burning to protect the continuous parade of ships plying the waters along California's rugged coastline.
 
Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    
Price: $21.00
 

Lighthouses and LifeSaving on the Oregon Coast,  by David Pinyerd


The Oregon Coast had been the site of shipwrecks even before Lewis and Clark’s arrival in 1805.  As the population grew, the Oregon coastline remained unguarded by lighthouses and lifesavers for decades. Economic and political pressures finally forced the federal government to build the first Oregon lighthouse in 1857 at the Umpqua River.  The U.S. Life-Saving Service followed in 1878 with a station at the mouth of Coos Bay.  Eventually, most of the harbor entrances and headlands were protected by both the Lighthouse Service and the Life-Saving Service, the precursors of today’s Coast Guard.  David Pinyerd combines thorough research with an extensive collection of previously unpublished photographs to create a vivid portrait of a coastal economy dependent upon the Pacific Ocean.  This book commemorates the heroes who served to warn, protect, and rescue those who braved those often treacherous waters.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00

 

 Florida Lighthouses,  by John Hairr

 

With the second-longest coastline in the United States, and its position between the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico, Florida played a key role in the early expansion of American trade routes.  But the state’s several capes and dangerous reefs, rocks, and shoals made travel quite perilous to unwary mariners.
In the 19th Century, as commerce and traffic began to grow between ports on the East Coast and along the Gulf of Mexico, it became necessary to construct aids to navigation along the state’s long and treacherous coast.  Lighthouses in a variety of styles and sizes were erected on what, at the time, were some of the most desolate regions of the southeastern United States and included lonely offshore islands.  Manned and inhabited by vigilant keepers and their families, these towers stood as sentinels that illuminated the dark seas and provided a beacon to guide lost travelers.  John Hairr has compiled a fascinating visual tour that tells the tale of that long ago maritime era and the lighthouses that once called sailors safely home.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00

 

Georgia's Lighthouses, by Patricia Morris 

 

When British general James Oglethorpe landed on Georgia’s coast in 1733, he realized that the success of his new colony, Savannah, depended largely on its establishment and development as a commercial port.  Only three years later, in 1736, the first lighthouse was built on Tybee Island.  Beginning there at the mouth of the Savannah River, this volume travels down the coast, telling the very different stories of the Cockspur Light, Sapelo Light, St. Simons Light, and Cumberland Light, which is now located on a private island.  Despite storms, erosion, and some neglect, the Georgia lights have saved countless sailors, helped to establish commerce and trade, and protected the coast.  Of the lighthouses built, only five remain today; two are operational lights—Tybee Island and St. Simons Island.  Rich in history, these lighthouses help to define the story of Georgia’s 100-mile coastline.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00

 

Guarding Door County: Lighthouses and Life-Saving Stations,  by Stacy Thomas & Virginia Thomas  

 

Jutting out of Wisconsin into the blue waters of Lake Michigan, the scenic peninsula of Door County is endowed with the longest coastline of any county in the nation.  Since the mid-1800s, the region has boasted a strong maritime industry, dependent on the constant vigilance and efforts of U.S. Coast Guard units.  The county has been home to as many as 12 historic light stations, as well as three life-saving stations.  Beginning with Pottawatomie Light in 1837 and Sturgeon Bay Canal Life-Saving Station in 1886, keepers and surfmen survived both boredom and peril to ensure safe navigation and commerce, while rescuing those in distress.  Stacy and Virginia Thomas are both actively involved in restoring lighthouses.  In their presentation of these rare archival photographs, stories of shipwrecks, rescues, service, and pride spring to life.  Rescue images of the Otter, a schooner which wrecked in 1895, are especially noteworthy. 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00

 

Lighthouses of Southwest Michigan, by Susan Roark Hoyt 

 

As the coastal towns of southwestern Michigan began to grow in the 1800s, commerce and shipping traffic flourished, making way for the development of lighthouses to ensure vessels' safe passage into port. Lighthouses of Southwest Michigan takes readers on an exciting journey through the history of seven such structures, from the St. Joseph, South Haven, and Kalamazoo River Lights to the Holland Harbor, Grand Haven, Muskegon, and White River Lights.  The author, a writer, educator, and lighthouse historian, presents a rare collection of archival photographs and explores the legacy of these fascinating structures, the people who maintained them, and the ships and communities they protected. 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00

 

Lighthouses of Northwest Michigan,  by Susan Roark Hoyt

 

After the first settlers reached northwestern Michigan, the region's immense pine forests were quickly cultivated into a thriving lumber industry.  Coastal towns sprang up to support sawmills, and soon lumber schooners arrived to carry large loads of timber to ports across Lake Michigan.  Their journeys were not without dangers, however.  Rudimentary harbors made docking and loading hazardous while shoals and reefs, hidden beneath the water's surface, threatened to ravage the unsuspecting vessels.  The need for lighthouses to mark these dangerous waters and harbor entrances was crucial to prevent the loss of lives and valuable cargo.  In this companion to her first book about the lighthouses in southwest Michigan, the author completes her history of lighthouses that guarded Lake Michigan's eastern shoreline. 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00 

 

Lighthouses and Lifesaving along the Connecticut and Rhode Island Coast,  by James Claflin

 

The U.S. Light-House Establishment and the U.S. Life-Saving Service, when merged, became the U.S. Coast Guard.  Author James Claflin combines here a descriptive text and a diverse collection of over 200 vintage images, from private as well as museum collections, in a tribute to the men and women who assumed the responsibility of lighting New England‘s rocky coastline and protecting the mariners who traveled it.
Thousands of vessels faced the dangers of the rugged sea, which caused hundreds of shipwrecks off the coast with devastating losses.  Here you will see the lighthouse keeper at Bullock's Point Light as he surveys the damage from the Hurricane of 1938, witness the life savers at Block Island's Sandy Point Station where first word of the wreck of the steamer Larchmont was received, and experience life on an offshore lightship.  This book chronicles the days of the rescuers, the lighthouse keepers and the evolution of lighthouse architecture.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00

 

New York State Lighthouses,  by Robert G. Müller Title

 
Robert G. Muller writes and lectures on lighthouse history, and his photography has appeared in newsletters, magazines, newspapers, a calendar and a movie.  In 2005, he was the recipient of an award for “outstanding contributions to lighthouse preservation.”  In New York State Lighthouses, he explores the great lighthouse heritage of New York State.  Second only to Michigan in the number of lighthouses it contains, New York boasts a lighthouse legacy that stretches from the Great Lakes to the tip of Long Island.  Many of these lighthouses, even some no longer in existence, were photographed for use on early postcards and are assembled for the first time in the pages of this book.
 
Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    
Price: $21.00 
 

Lighthouses of San Diego,  by Kim Fahlen and Karen Scanlon  

 

As his ship rounded the high point off Point Loma, San Diego, in 1859, Richard Henry Dana wrote, “We were greeted by the cheering presence of a light-house.”  In reality, beams from San Diego’s first lighthouse were repeatedly lost in cloud and fog, and all too soon came agitation for a more effective light at a lower elevation.  By 1891, two new lighthouses were constructed to achieve what one could not—a major light on the low tip of Point Loma and a secondary light at Ballast Point.  Although abandonment of the first lighthouse structure was nearly catastrophic, it still survives today to charm millions of visitors.  This pictorial history presents new glimpses of the famous and lesser-known lighthouses of San Diego, thanks to the memories and photographs belonging to families of the men who kept the lights burning.  

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price: $21.00