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Business & Stores
 

A&P: The Story of the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company,  by Avis H. Anderson 

 

The Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company, better known as A&P, was born in 1859 as a Manhattan mail-order business.  In 1925, A&P operated more than thirteen thousand grocery stores nationwide, with more than forty thousand employees.  By 1950, approximately ten cents out of every dollar spent on food in the United States passed over A&P counters.  This is the story of how cofounder George Huntington Hartford and his sons achieved such popularity and loyalty with so many consumers.  Stunning vintage photographs show such nostalgic scenes as the elegant early stores, their gleaming window displays, and red horse-drawn delivery wagons with the A&P logo emblazoned on their sides.  Shoppers choose from rows of colorful merchandise and fresh produce; uniformed storekeepers make change from ornate registers; and the founder's son tastes A&P's Eight O'Clock coffee.  A&P is still an industry leader.  This history of the supermarket where America grew up shopping shows why.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price:  $21.00

 

Carvel Ice Cream,  by Lauren McGowen & Jennifer Dempsey

 

Tom Carvel arrived in America in 1910, an unassuming, wide-eyed, young Greek immigrant who would grow up to be an inventor, an innovator and, ultimately, an American icon.  Holding a host of jobs, from drummer to mechanic, Carvel’s relentless entrepreneurial spirit led him down a path less traveled.  At 26 years old, Carvel met his future wife, Agnes Stewart.  He borrowed $15 from her and began selling ice cream out of the back of his truck.  What started as an old truck plugged into a pottery store is now more than 500 franchised locations throughout the nation and abroad and Carvel is one of the best loved and most recognized names in the industry.  In fulfilling his American dream, Carvel is credited for patenting machinery, originating the “buy one, get one” coupon, starring in his own commercials, and being the “father of franchising.”

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price:  $21.00
 

Chicago's Sweet Candy History 

 

Baby Ruth, Milk Duds, Juicy Fruit, Cracker Jack, Milky Way, Tootsie Roll. Whatever your favorite candy may be, chances are it came from Chicago.  For much of its history, the city churned out an astonishing one third of all candy produced in the United States.  Some of the biggest names in the industry were based in Chicago: Curtiss, Brach, Tootsie Roll, Leaf, Wrigley, and Mars.  Along with these giants were smaller, family-based companies such as fundraising specialist Worlds Finest Chocolate and the Ferrara Pan Candy Company, maker of Red Hots and Jaw Breakers.  At its peak, the Chicago candy industry boasted more than 100 companies employing some 25,000 Chicagoans.  Packed with vintage images of stores, factories, and advertisements, this fascinating photographic history covers more than 150 years of the candy trade and explores how Chicago candy makers created strong bonds between people and their favorite treats.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.

Price:  $21.00

 

 

 

Cincinnati's Historic Findlay Market,  by Liz Tilton

 

Established in 1852, Findlay Market is Ohio’s oldest public market in continuous operation. Findlay Market opened just outside Cincinnati’s city limits on land donated by James Findlay, in an area then known as the “Northern Liberties.”  Because the Northern Liberties lay beyond city jurisdiction, the area was known for social liberties such as prostitution, bootlegging, and thievery.  In an effort to protect “the housewives” shopping there, city officials annexed the Findlay Market area.  Annexation, however, did little to quell Findlay Market’s outlying spirit. This spirit has contributed to its outlasting every other municipal market in the city and the determination of generations of vendors and shoppers who have forged strong relationships with one another and who continue to demand the City of Cincinnati wrestle with the complex urban challenges surrounding this beloved institution.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price:  $21.00

 

Cleveland's Department Stores,  by Christopher Faircloth

 

Originating as simple one- or two-room storefront operations, Cleveland’s department stores grew as population and industry in the region boomed throughout the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th. They moved into ever larger and elaborate structures in an attempt to woo the shopping dollars of blue-collar and genteel Clevelanders alike. Stores such as Halle’s, Higbee’s, May Company, Bailey Company, Sterling-Lindner-Davis, and others both competed with and complemented one another, all the while leaving an indelible mark on the culture of northeast Ohio and beyond. With many black and white images, some dating from the late 1800s, this book presents the story of the stores---from the humble origins of Halle’s horse-drawn delivery wagons and the elaborate design of Higbee’s on Public Square to Christmas favorites like Mr. Jingeling and the massive Christmas tree at Sterling-Lindner-Davis.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price:  $21.00

 

 

 

 

Dayton's Department Store,  by Mary Firestone
 
Dayton’s Department Store, grand in scope and company spirit, enjoyed a century in the limelight as one of the nation’s leading retailers.  Though it has since shared the fate of many other urban department stores, devotees who shopped there still treasure the memory of Dayton’s.  Originally called Goodfellows, the store got its start in 1902 when real estate investor and banker George Draper Dayton became a silent partner in the business.  He soon took over the company but had to learn the ropes of retail as he went along, since he had never intended to become a merchant.  The early years were not without struggles, but Dayton’s department store nevertheless was an instant hit with its daylight-filled aisles, generous return policies, and quality merchandise.  The Minneapolis store became a vibrant self-contained community with a post office, newspaper, infirmary, laundry, bakery, and even a college.  “Daytonians” worked and played together around the clock, in baseball and bowling teams, glee clubs, and orchestras.  Over time, Dayton’s reach extended far into the upper Midwest, with stores in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin, including the development of the nation’s first indoor mall. 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.   

Price:  $21.00

 

 

Foley's,  by Lasker Meyer

 

The Foley's saga began in Ireland in the late 1800s when William L. Foley set sail for America. There he opened a store in Houston and hired two young nephews.  When the nephews felt the entrepreneurial urge to run their own store, their uncle gave them $2,000 to get started.  On February 12, 1900, the Foley Brothers Dry Goods Company opened for business at 507 Main Street.  An estimated 44,000 residents visited the store that day.  Sales of $128.29 were tabulated.  The Foley brothers later sold the store to Robert I. Cohen of Galveston, who put his son George in charge of operating it.  With the aid of six Meyer brothers from Galveston, George built it into the largest store in Texas.  In 1945, Fred Lazarus, a department store exec from Ohio, visited Houston and saw the store’s potential.  In 1946, Foley Brothers became Foley's, owned by Federated Department Stores

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs. 

Price:  $21.00

 

The Harris Company,  by Aimmee L. Rodriguez, Richard A. Hanks, Robin S. Hanks

 

For almost 100 years, the slogan “Harris’ Has It” set a standard for quality merchandise, selection, and personal service.  With photographs collected from numerous area sources, the authors recall the history of the stores that became known simply as “The Harris Company.” Starting in 1905 with only 25 feet of frontage at its original San Bernardino store, this partnership of three immigrant brothers grew into a corporation of nine stores, with the flagship store alone worth over $1 million.  The Harris Company was the first in the region to enhance the shopping experience with its introduction of elevators, electric signs, and escalators. Although the store closed in 1999, the Harris Company is remembered throughout the Inland Empire as a department store that was more than just business, it was “looking after people.”
 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price:  $19.95

 

 

Hess's Department Store,  by Frank A. Whelan & Kurt D. Zwikl

 

With its unique combination of style and showmanship, Hess’s Department Store was a shopping legend for almost 100 years.  Hess’s was founded in 1897 in Allentown by brothers Max and Charles Hess.  From its start as a dry goods store, it became the downtown heart of Pennsylvania’s third-largest city for much of the 20th century.  Its reputation was further enhanced by Max Hess’s son, a showman for merchandising.  For 26 years, Frank A. Whelan was the historical feature writer for the Allentown Morning Call.  Kurt D. Zwikl’s late father, William Zwikl, was the longtime photographer for Hess’s.  Through a series of photographs, many from private collections and seldom seen, the authors bring to life again the glory days of Hess’s Department Store.  

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price:  $21.00

 

 

Marshall Field's

 

     "Give the lady what she wants!"  ...Marshall Field

Anyone who has admired the Great Tree while waiting in line for the Walnut Room at Christmas time can attest that Chicago's loyalty to Marshall Field's is fierce.  Dayton-Hudson even had to take out advertising around town to apologize for changing the Field's hallowed green shopping bags.  And with good reason.  The store and those who ran it shaped the city's streets, subsidized its culture and heralded its progress.  The resulting commercial empire dictated wholesale trade terms in Calcutta and sponsored towns in North Carolina, but its essence was always Chicago.  So when the Marshall Field name was retired in 2006 after the stores were purchased by Macy's, protest slogans like "Field's is Chicago" and Field's: as Chicago as it gets" weren't just emotional hype.  Many still hope that name will be resurrected like the city it helped support after the Great Fire and during the Great Depression.  Until then, fans of Marshall Field's can celebrate its history via this warm look back at the beloved institution.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 155 pgs.

Price:  $19.95

                                                                                                  

 

Philadelphia's Golden Age of Retail,  by Lawrence M. Arrigale & Thomas H. Keels 

 

Philadelphia is not only the birthplace of America but also the birthplace of America’s consumer culture.  From the Civil War until Vietnam, Philadelphia’s thriving middle class made the city a mercantile mecca, home to some of America’s largest and most innovative department and specialty stores.  Market Street between Seventh Street and Philadelphia City Hall was lined with five major department stores: John Wanamaker, Strawbridge & Clothier, Gimbels, Lit Brothers, and N. Snellenburg & Co.  Here, shoppers could buy everything they needed to furnish their house from attic to basement, as well as the house itself.  On nearby Chestnut and Walnut Streets, the carriage trade selected silver and jewelry at J.E. Caldwell & Co. and Bailey Banks & Biddle, haute couture at Nan Duskin and the Blum Store, and men’s clothing at Jacob Reed’s Sons.  This book illustrates how these emporia taught generations of Philadelphians the proper way to live.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price:  $21.00

 

 

Remembering Hudson's: The Grand Dame of Detroit Retailing

 

For over a century, the J.L. Hudson’s Department Store on Woodward Avenue was more than just a store—it was a Detroit icon and a world-class cultural treasure.  Hudson's redefined the way Detroiters shopped and enjoyed leisure time.  A solid and lofty icon built by businesspeople who believed in their passion, Hudson's defined Detroit's downtown, creating trends and traditions in consumer culture that still resonate with us today.  At 25 stories, it was the world’s tallest department store, and was at one time home to the most exceptional offerings in shopping, dining, services, and entertainment.  The store prided itself on stocking everything from grand pianos to spools of thread.  In addition to departments offering fashionable clothing and home furnishings, the original Hudson’s store featured an auditorium, a circulating library, dining rooms, barber shops, a photo studio, holiday exhibits, a magnificent place called Toytown, and the world’s largest American flag. 

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs. 

Price:  $21.00

 

 

Long Island Aircraft Manufacturers,  by Joshua Stoff

 

Significant aircraft manufacturing began on Long Island in the early 20th century and boomed during the war years.  Long Islanders helped transform aviation from a dangerous sport to a viable means of transportation, while also producing a large portion of the nation's aerial arsenal in times of war.  From the first frail biplanes to the warbirds of World War II and the sleek fighters of the jet age, aviation companies on Long Island helped make aviation the integral part of our world that it is today.  During the 20th century, over 70 firms came to build aircraft on Long Island.  Some of these firms lasted for decades and became famed builders of historic aircraft, such as Grumman, Republic, Curtiss, Fairchild, and Sikorsky.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.    

Price:  $21.00

 

 

Pig 'N Whistle,  by Veronica Gelakoska

 

The Pig 'N Whistle restaurants operated from 1908 to 1968 at more than 40 West Coast locations from Los Angeles to Seattle. These elegant lunch rooms in San Francisco, Oakland, Beverly Hills, Pasadena, and elsewhere were born out of the great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. When hotelier John H. Gage left the rubble on Market Street to make a fresh start, he opened a soda fountain next door to Los Angeles City Hall in 1908 and soon returned to San Francisco to open a second in the newly rebuilt White House Department Store. Dutch immigrant Sidney Hoedemaker became the chain's president, and under his direction, Pig 'N Whistle added Melody Lane, one of the first L.A. restaurants to open a cocktail bar, a development mirrored in the Hollywood film noir classic, Mildred Pierce. Restaurateur Chris Breed reinvigorated the memory of the Egyptian Theater Pig 'N Whistle by re-establishing the classic franchise in 2002 on Hollywood Boulevard.

 

Softcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price:  $21.00

Remembering Marshall Field's,  by by Leslie Goddard 

 

Opened in 1852 as a small dry goods business, the store that became Marshall Field's reigned for more than 150 years as Chicago's leading department store, celebrated for its exceptional service, spectacular window displays, and fashionable merchandise.  Marshall Field and Company weathered economic downturns, spectacular fires, and fierce competition to become a world-class retailer and merchandise powerhouse.  Marshall Field sent buyers to Europe for the latest fashions, insisted on courteous service, and immortalized the phrase "give the lady what she wants."  The store prided itself on its dazzling Tiffany mosaic dome, Walnut Room restaurant, bronze clocks, and a string of firsts including the first bridal registry and first book signing. 

 

Sftcover, 6 x 9, 128 pgs.     

Price:  $21.00